1. bookVolume 72 (2021): Issue 1 (June 2021)
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Journal
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05 Mar 2010
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English
access type Open Access

The Linguistic Mix of Names in Lll

Published Online: 27 Sep 2021
Page range: 264 - 271
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
First Published
05 Mar 2010
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

The names in Shakespeare’s Love’s Labour’s Lost present a delightful linguistic mix. The names of major characters are Anglicized names of actual French nobles, which emphasizes the thematic parallelism of historical and fictive events. Other names broaden the international landscape, including Nathaniel, a biblical association, Forester (which is French as well as English), and Armado, a Spanish tag. The length of this paper does not allow room to describe many names in detail. However, the cross-cultural puns make this play especially interesting; e.g., Moth has at least two meanings in English, but pronounced mot in French means ‘word,’ ‘remark,’ ‘cue,’ or ‘answer to a riddle’ – which points most clearly to a thematic meaning. A full analysis of this play will appear soon in my book Names as Metaphors in Shakespeare’s Comedies (Vernon Press).

Keywords

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