1. bookVolume 3 (2020): Issue 2 (December 2020)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2544-6339
First Published
16 Apr 2017
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

Advancements in the Evolution of Human Capacities to Know

Published Online: 31 Dec 2020
Volume & Issue: Volume 3 (2020) - Issue 2 (December 2020)
Page range: 66 - 69
Received: 01 Jul 2020
Accepted: 01 Sep 2020
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2544-6339
First Published
16 Apr 2017
Publication timeframe
2 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

The premise of this paper is that there are three distinct and hierarchical ‘categories of knowledge’ (Pharoah 2018). The first of these is physiological knowledge which is acquired over generations through the interaction between replicating lineages and the environment. This interaction facilitates the evolution of meaningful physiological structures, forms, functions, and qualitative ascriptions. Second, there is phenomenal knowledge which is qualified by the utilisation of real-time experience to effect an individuated spatiotemporal subjective perspective. This capability requires sophisticated cognitive capabilities. Conceptual knowledge is the third category and constitutes a network of abstracted principles about the spatiotemporal and phenomenal world of experience. From this starting premise, I argue that human knowledge can still be viewed as impoverished because of the absence of the next category which has not yet emerged. I suggest that this category will be apparent when a fuller understanding is acquired concerning the dynamic nature of concept construction and structuring. This will demand a transdisciplinary and multimodal approach.

Keywords

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