1. bookVolume 131 (2021): Issue 1 (January 2021)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2083-4829
First Published
23 Apr 2014
Publication timeframe
1 time per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

Human Milk Banks – biobanking for preterms and newborns

Published Online: 30 Dec 2021
Volume & Issue: Volume 131 (2021) - Issue 1 (January 2021)
Page range: 82 - 84
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2083-4829
First Published
23 Apr 2014
Publication timeframe
1 time per year
Languages
English
Abstract

Breast milk banks are specialized hospital-located laboratories. Their role is to provide breast milk to newborns and infants who, for various reasons, cannot be fed with their mother’s milk. They are an inseparable part of intensive neonatal care units and an element of the mother and child care system. They are financed by hospitals in which they operate. Milk is obtained from donors, thoroughly examined, pasteurized and passed directly to children in need. Food recipients are mainly premature babies in the neonatal intensive care unit. As proven by numerous scientific studies, breast milk is the most appropriate food for newborns and infants. Breast milk is also recommended by Polish, foreign and international organizations and institutions involved in nutritional problems of children.

There are 226 Breast Milk Banks in Europe (first organized in 1909 in Vienna) and the organization of additional 16 is planned. In Poland there are only 9 banks and two more are in the organizational phase. Breast milk banks in Poland operate on the basis of in-hospital regulations. The European Association of Milk Banks strives to unify the procedures of conduct in all units, including Poland.

Keywords

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