1. bookVolume 70 (2021): Issue 1 (June 2021)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2247-059X
First Published
31 Jan 1951
Publication timeframe
1 time per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

Side effects induced by using the protective equipment and tips for avoiding them

Published Online: 28 May 2022
Volume & Issue: Volume 70 (2021) - Issue 1 (June 2021)
Page range: 5 - 10
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2247-059X
First Published
31 Jan 1951
Publication timeframe
1 time per year
Languages
English
Abstract

Severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (SARS)-CoV-2, the cause of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has caused a global pandemic with worldwide morbidity, mortality and disruptions to society. Undoubtedly, the global spread of the COVID-19 pandemic had warranted universal precautions to slow the rate of infection. Hand hygiene, social distancing, regular disinfection of surfaces and avoidance of touching one’s face are some of the measures which have been used in an attempt to decrease exponential disease spread. The epidemiology of SARS-CoV-2 had indicated that most infections were spread by respiratory droplets, through exposure to an infected individual at close range. For this reason, healthcare professionals are mandated to wear personal protective equipment (PPE) for a prolonged period of time when caring for COVID-19 patients. On the other hand, the COVID-19 pandemic has led to an increased use of face protection such as surgical masks and eye protection not only amongst healthcare workers but also now the general public. Prolonged use of N95 and surgical masks by healthcare professionals during COVID-19 has caused adverse effects such as headaches, rash, acne, skin breakdown and impaired cognition. This review delves into various adverse effects of prolonged mask use and provides recommendations to ease the burden on healthcare professionals. The magnitude of this condition is clinically significant and might worsen if the current outbreak further continues to spread widely and stays for a longer time, affecting the work performance of healthcare workers. Perhaps better strategies are needed for designing various PPE and reducing the duration for which healthcare workers are required to use them.

Keywords

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