1. bookVolume 29 (2021): Issue 3 (July 2021)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
First Published
08 Aug 2013
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

Deity, love, punishment, rage, and mythonyms from head to toes. A brief history of some medical terms

Published Online: 31 Jul 2021
Page range: 327 - 331
Received: 25 Jun 2021
Accepted: 07 Jul 2021
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
First Published
08 Aug 2013
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

Although it is undoubtful that today’s Medical English is rooted in Greek and Latin, it is particularly interesting that figures from Greek mythology are the roots of words to describe conditions, body parts, feelings, substances, etc. While there are numerous medical terms that are derived from the names of Greek mythological figures, this paper will only investigate words ranging from A to H and will try to justify the relationship between the concepts and the choice of terminology.

Keywords

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