1. bookVolume 69 (2021): Issue 4 (December 2021)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
1339-9357
First Published
30 Mar 2019
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

Theorizing Practice and Practicing Practice – Public Folklore in US Higher Education

Published Online: 24 Jan 2022
Page range: 552 - 569
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
1339-9357
First Published
30 Mar 2019
Publication timeframe
4 times per year
Languages
English
Abstract

Higher education learning programs in folklore and ethnology should include training for the mastery of ICH and public folklore practices that are integrated with core curricula, grounded in theory and designed to build comprehensive professionalization of these disciplines. It should theorize practice and include engagement in actual projects with impacts beyond the classroom. A disjunction between theory and public practice which persisted for decades is now being addressed in graduate programs in ethnology and folklore, reaching towards what Bourdieu calls the “reconciling of theoretical and practical intentions”. The theories, issues and practices of public folklore currently and potentially taught in the United States suggest approaches that can be used for ethnology and ICH training. Topics can include cultural brokerage, intervention, heritage policies, cultural representation theories, dialogism, cultural sustainability, recontextualization, activism and advocacy, how community is defined, ethics and informed consent along with topics in heritage studies and the study of tourism. Practices taught can include multiple modes of presentation, media production, archiving, organizational and financial management, folklore in education and community engagement. Graduate training should include the intellectual history and contemporary dimensions of intervention in ongoing cultural practices transformative for communities and relationships of practitioners to their traditions. Folklore should be viewed as a practicing profession integrating comprehensive university training and reciprocal relationships between knowledge production in universities and the public sphere.

Keywords

Abrahams, R. (1999). American Academic and Public Folklore: Late-Twentieth-Century Musings. Journal of Folklore Research, 36 (2–3), 127–37. Search in Google Scholar

Association for Cultural Equity (2021). Repatriation. Accessible at : http://www.culturalequity.org/initiatives/repatriation (Accessed December 8, 2021). Search in Google Scholar

Bakhtin, M. M. (1981). The Dialogic Imagination. (M. Holquist, Ed., C. Emerson, M. Holquist, Trans.). University of Texas Press. Search in Google Scholar

Baron, R. (1999). Theorizing Public Folklore Practice: Documentation, Genres of Representation, and Everyday Competencies. Journal of Folklore Research, 36(2–3), 185–201. Search in Google Scholar

Baron, R. (2010). Sins of Objectification?: Agency, Mediation, and Community Cultural Self-Determination in Public Folklore and Cultural Tourism Programming. Journal of American Folklore, 123(487), 63–91.10.5406/jamerfolk.123.487.0063 Search in Google Scholar

Baron, R. (2016). Public Folklore Dialogism and Critical Heritage Studies. International Journal of Heritage Studies, 22(8), 588–606.10.1080/13527258.2016.1150320 Search in Google Scholar

Baron, R. (2021). Cultural Brokerage Revisited. Journal of Folklore Research, 58(2), 63–104.10.2979/jfolkrese.58.2.03 Search in Google Scholar

Baron, R., Cara, A. (2011). Introduction: Creolization as Cultural Creativity. In: R. Baron, A. Cara (Eds.), Creolization as Cultural Creativity (pp. 3–19). University Press of Mississippi. Search in Google Scholar

Barrow, T., Armitage, S., Tydeman, W. (1982). Introduction. In: T. Barrow, S. Armitage, W. Tydeman (Eds.), Reading into Photography, Selected Essays, 1959-1980 (pp. 1–11). University of New Mexico Press. Search in Google Scholar

Bauman, R., Sawin, P., Carpenter, I. (1992). Reflections on the Folklife Festival: An Ethnography of Participant Experience. Special Publications of the Folklore Institute No. 2. Bloomington: Indiana University Folklore Institute. Search in Google Scholar

Bausinger, H. (1999). Disengagement by Engagement: Volkskunde in a Period of Change. Journal of Folklore Research, 36(2/3), 143–149. Search in Google Scholar

Bourdieu, P. ([1980] 1990). The Logic of Practice (R. Nice, Trans.). Stanford University Press.10.1515/9781503621749 Search in Google Scholar

Briggs, C. (2016). Disciplining Folkloristics. In: L. Haring (Ed.), Grand Theory in Folkloristics, (pp. 125–39). Indiana University Press. Search in Google Scholar

Bruner, E. (2005). Culture on Tour: Ethnographies of Travel. The University of Chicago Press. Search in Google Scholar

Cohen, E. (1988). Authenticity and Commoditization in Tourism. Annals of Tourism Research, 15(4), 371–386.10.1016/0160-7383(88)90028-X Search in Google Scholar

De Certeau, M. (1984). The Practice of Everyday Life. (S. Rendall, Trans.) University of California Press. Search in Google Scholar

Edwards, E. (1992). Introduction. In: E. Edwards (Ed.), Anthropology and Photography, 1860-1920 (pp. 3–17). Yale University Press. Search in Google Scholar

Goodman, N. (1968). Languages of Art. Bobbs-Merrill. Search in Google Scholar

Green, A. ([1992]2007). Public Folklore’s Name: A Partisan’s Note. In: R. Baron, N. Spitzer (Eds.), Public Folklore (pp. 49–63). University Press of Mississippi. Search in Google Scholar

Hertz, E. (2015). Bottoms, Genuine and Spurious. In: N. Adell, R. Bendix, C. Bortolotto, M. Tauschek (Eds.), Between Imagined Communities and Communities of Practice: Participation, Territory and the Making of Heritage (pp. 25–27). Göttingen: Universitätsverlag Göttingen. Search in Google Scholar

Hufford, M. (1994). Introduction: Rethinking the Cultural Mission. In: M. Hufford (Ed.), Conserving Culture: A New Discourse on Heritage (pp. 1–11). University of Illinois Press. Search in Google Scholar

Hughes, E. (1958). Men and their Work. Free Press. Search in Google Scholar

International Society for Ethnology and Folklore (2021). “SIEF and UNESCO – Making A Difference”. Accessible at: https://www.siefhome.org/downloads/publications/statements/SIEF-UNESCO%20position%20paper.pdf, (Accessed November 29, 2021). Search in Google Scholar

Jacknis, I. (1984). Franz Boas and Photography. Studies in Visual Communication, 10(1), 2–60.10.1111/j.2326-8492.1984.tb00001.x Search in Google Scholar

Jacobs, M. (2014). Cultural Brokerage: Addressing Boundaries and the New Paradigm of Safeguarding Intangible Cultural Heritage Folklore Studies, Transdisciplinary Perspectives and UNESCO. Volkskunde, 115(4), 265–291. Search in Google Scholar

Kirshenblatt-Gimblett, B. ([1992] 2007). Mistaken Dichotomies. In: R. Baron, N. Spitzer (Eds.), Public Folklore (pp. 29–48). University Press of Mississippi. Search in Google Scholar

Köhle-Hezinger, C. (1999). Cultural Brokerage and the Public Sector: Response to Roger Abrahams. Journal of Folklore Research, 36(2–3), 138–142. Search in Google Scholar

Kodish, D. (2011). Envisioning Folklore Activism. Journal of American Folklore, 124(491), 31–60.10.5406/jamerfolk.124.491.0031 Search in Google Scholar

Larson, M. S. (1977). The Rise of Professionalism: A Sociological Analysis. University of California Press. Search in Google Scholar

Lloyd, T. (2021). Introduction. In: What Folklorists Do: Professional Possibilities in Folklore Studies (pp. xiii–xiiii). Indiana University Press. Search in Google Scholar

Local Learning. Journal of Folklore and Education, Accessible at: https://jfepublications.org/. (Accessed December 8, 2021). Search in Google Scholar

Long, L. M. (Ed.) (2004). Culinary Tourism. Lexington: The University Press of Kentucky. Search in Google Scholar

N’Diaye, D. (2016). Agency, Reciprocal Engagement and Applied Folklore Practice: Beyond the Smithsonian Folklife Festival. In: O. Cadaval, S. Kim, D. N’Diaye (Eds.), Curatorial Conversations: Cultural Representation and the Smithsonian Folklife Festival (pp. 275–301). University Press of Mississippi. Search in Google Scholar

Parsons, T. (1968). Professions. In: D. Sills, R. Merton (Eds.), International Encyclopedia of the Social Sciences (Vol. 12, pp. 536–547). Macmillan. Search in Google Scholar

Picard, M. (1990). “Cultural Tourism” in Bali: Cultural Performances as Tourist Attraction. Indonesia, 49(Apr. 1990), 37–74.10.2307/3351053 Search in Google Scholar

Serrano, S., Kreber, C. (2014). Professionalization of the University and the Profession as Macintyrean Practice. Studies in Philosophy and Education, 34(6), 1–14. Search in Google Scholar

Smith, P., Meyers, A., Cook, H. (Eds.) (2014). Ways of Making and Knowing: The Material Culture of Empirical Knowledge. The University of Chicago Press. Search in Google Scholar

Spitzer, N. ([1992] 2007). Cultural Conversations: Metaphors and Methods in Public Folklore. In: R. Baron, N. Spitzer (Eds.), Public Folklore (pp. 77-103). University Press of Mississippi. Search in Google Scholar

Stefano, M. (2016). Critical Heritage Work: Pub lic Folklore in the United States, Special Issue of the International Journal of Heritage Studies, 22(8), 585–651.10.1080/13527258.2016.1193040 Search in Google Scholar

Stefano, M. (2021). Practical Considerations for Safeguarding Intangible Cultural Heritage. Routledge.10.4324/9781003034216 Search in Google Scholar

Titon, J. (2015). Sustainability, Resilience, and Adaptive Management. In: S. Pettan, S., J. Titon (Eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Applied Ethnomusicology (pp. 157–198). New York: Oxford University Press. Search in Google Scholar

Whisnant, D. (1988). Public Sector Folklore as Intervention: Lessons from the Past, Prospects for the Future. In: B. Feintuch (Ed.), The Conservation of Culture: Folklorists and the Public Sector (pp. 233–247). University Press of Kentucky. Search in Google Scholar

Wright, T. (1992). Photography: Theories of Realism and Convention. In: E. Edwards (Ed.), Anthropology and Photography, 1860-1920 (pp. 18–31). Yale University Press. Search in Google Scholar

Recommended articles from Trend MD

Plan your remote conference with Sciendo