1. bookVolume 53 (2004): Issue 1-6 (December 2004)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2509-8934
First Published
22 Feb 2016
Publication timeframe
1 time per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

Inbreeding in Pinus Radiata – V. The Effects of Inbreeding on Fecundity

Published Online: 27 Oct 2017
Page range: 80 - 88
Received: 09 Jun 2004
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
eISSN
2509-8934
First Published
22 Feb 2016
Publication timeframe
1 time per year
Languages
English
Abstract

A successful inbreeding and hybrid breeding strategy in tree improvement requires that 1) inbreeding (selfing) can produce superior inbred lines (effective purging of deleterious alleles), 2) there is heterosis among crosses of inbred lines, 3) early selection between lines is effective, and 4) inbreeding will not substantially reduce reproductive ability. We have previously reported that inbreeding depression on growth was lower in radiata pine relative to other conifers and segregation in the first two-generations of selfs generated superior inbred trees. In addition, we have observed that early selection among inbred trees (lines) was more effective than in out-crossed populations and there was an apparent heterosis in radiata pine. In this study, the effect of inbreeding on the reproductive ability in young and adult trees of radiata pine has been quantified from five populations of varied inbreeding levels (F =0, 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, and 0.75). It was observed that the effects of inbreeding depression on fecundity was higher at a young age than at older age and inbreeding depression at a young age is due to two factors: 1) a delay of reproductive age (about 8.3, and 8.5% of trees delayed for F =0.5 and F =0.75 populations, respectively) and 2) a true reduction of flowering trees (6.7 and 13.1% more trees having no flowers for F =0.5 and F =0.75 populations than F =0 population, respectively). Despite significant inbreeding depression on the percentage of female reproductive trees and the number of cones on adult trees, overall inbreeding depression on fecundity was low in radiata pine. One founder clone contributed most of the significant inbreeding depression observed for the population of eight founder clones. It was observed that fecundity varied more widely among the eight clones than among the inbreeding level (self and outcross).

Keywords

BINGHAM, E. T.: Possibilities for improvement of western white pine by inbreeding. USDA For. Ser. Res. Pap. INT-44, 18 p. 197310.5962/bhl.title.69044Search in Google Scholar

DUREL, C. E., BERTIN, P., and KREMER, A.: Relationship between inbreeding depression and inbreeding coefficient in maritime pine (Pinus pinaster). Theor. Appl. Genet. 92: 347-356 (1996)10.1007/BF00223678Open DOISearch in Google Scholar

GRIFFIN, A. R. and LINDGREN, D.: Effect of inbreeding on production of filled seed in Pinus radiata - experimental results and a model of gene action. Theor. Appl. Genet. 71: 334-343 (1985)10.1007/BF00252077Search in Google Scholar

MATHESON, A. C., WU, H. X., SPENCER, D. J., RAYMOND, C. A. and GRIFFIN, A. R.: Inbreeding in Pinus radiata: III. The effect of inbreeding on age-age correlation and early selection efficiency. Silvae Genet. 51: 115-122 (2002)Search in Google Scholar

MORAN, G. F. and BELL, J. C.: The origin and genetic diversity of Pinus radiata in Australia. Theor. Appl. Genet. 73: 616-622 (1987)10.1007/BF00289203Search in Google Scholar

MORAN, G. F., BELL, J. C. and ELDRIDGE, K. G.: The genetic structure and the conservation of five natural populations of Pinus radiata. Can. J. For. Res. 18: 506-514 (1988) 10.1139/x88-074Search in Google Scholar

ORREWING, A. L.: Inbreeding and single crossing in Douglas-fir. For. Sci. 11: 279-290 (1965)Search in Google Scholar

ORR-EWING, A. L.: Inbreeding Douglas-fir to the S3 generation. Silvae Genet. 25: 179-183 (1976)Search in Google Scholar

PAWSEY, C. K.: Inbreeding radiata pine. Dept Nat. Dev. For. and Timb. Bur. Leaflet No 87, Forest Research Institute, Canberra 31 pp. (1964)Search in Google Scholar

RUDOLPH, T. D.: Cone set, seed yield. Seed quality, and early seedling development of S2 generation jack pine. Proceedings of the Tenth Central States Forest Tree Improvement Conference, Purdue University. West Lafayette. Pp 42-60 (1976)Search in Google Scholar

SAS Institute Inc.: SAS/STAT User’s Guide, Version 6, 4th Edition, Volume 1&2, Cary, North Carolina (1989)Search in Google Scholar

SNIEZKO, R. A.: Inbreeding and outcrossing in loblolly pine. Unpublished Ph.D. Thesis. North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, North Carolina. 50 p. (1984).Search in Google Scholar

WILCOX, M. D.: Inbreeding depression and genetic variances estimated from self-and cross-pollinated families of Pinus radiata. Silvae Genet. 32: 89-96 (1983)Search in Google Scholar

WILLIAMS, C. G. and SALVOLAINEN, O.: Inbreeding depression in conifers: implications for breeding strategy. For. Sci. 42: 102-117 (1996)Search in Google Scholar

WU, H. X., MATHESON, A. C. and SPENCER, D.: Inbreeding in Pinus radiata I. The effect of inbreeding on growth, survival and variance. Theor. and Appl. Genet. 97: 1256-1268 (1998a). -10.1007/s001220051018Open DOISearch in Google Scholar

WU, H. X., MATHESON, A. C. and SPENCER, D.: Inbreeding in Pinus radiata II. Time trend of inbreeding depression with tree age and effects on growth curve. N. Z. J. For. Sci. 28: 123-139 (1998b)Search in Google Scholar

WU, H. X., MATHESON, A. C. and ABARQUEZ, A.: Inbreeding in Pinus radiata IV. The effect of inbreeding on wood density. Ann. For. Sci. 59: 557-562 (2002).10.1051/forest:2002041Search in Google Scholar

Recommended articles from Trend MD

Plan your remote conference with Sciendo