1. bookVolume 13 (2021): Issue 1 (January 2021)
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
First Published
06 Apr 2009
Publication timeframe
1 time per year
Languages
English
access type Open Access

How does the ski boot affect human gait and joint loading?

Published Online: 24 May 2021
Page range: 163 - 169
Received: 11 Mar 2021
Accepted: 28 Mar 2021
Journal Details
License
Format
Journal
First Published
06 Apr 2009
Publication timeframe
1 time per year
Languages
English
Abstract

Study aim: To investigate the effect of wearing ski boots on kinematic and kinetic parameters of lower limbs during gait. Furthermore, loads in lower limb joints were assessed using the musculoskeletal model.

Material and methods: The study examined 10 healthy women with shoe size 40 (EUR). Kinematic and kinetic data of walking in ski boots and barefoot were collected using a Vicon system and Kistler plates. A musculoskeletal model derived from AnyBody Modeling System was used to calculate joint reaction forces.

Results: Wearing ski boots caused the range of motion in the knee joint to be significantly smaller and the hip joint to be significantly larger. Muscle torques were significantly greater in walking in ski boots for the knee and hip joints. Wearing ski boots reduced the reaction forces in the lower limb joints by 18% for the ankle, 16% for the knee, and 39% for the hip.

Conclusions: Ski boot causes changes in the ranges of angles in the lower limb joints and increases muscle torques in the knee and hip joints but it does not increase the load on the joints. Walking in a ski boot is not destructive in terms of forces acting in the lower limb joints.

Keywords

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